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Stuart has been named among the “Happiest Waterfront Towns in the US”, according to an article featured in Coastal Living Magazine in 2016. This town is well-known for many amenities, while the residents are able to enjoy an affordable cost-of-living. The weather is truly idyllic, particularly over the months of winter, when the average lowest temperature is around 68 degrees. Another attractive feature about this town is the air-quality index that surpasses the national average by as much as 40%.

A Brief History About Stuart Florida

In the year 1870, Spanish vessels bearing silver and gold were shipwrecked caused by a violent hurricane. Some treasure was recovered, which gave way to the naming this region “Treasure Coast”.

The Treasure Coast

This settlement was initially named Potsdam, named after the German landowner’s native town. In the year 1895, the name of the town changed to Stuart, in honor of a property owner. This man donated his portion of the land he owned to make provision for a railway station. In 1925, Stuart became the seat of Martin County.

About Riverwalk

The wooden promenade that hugs the St. Lucie River banks were named Riverwalk. Taking a walk along this boardwalk provides you with outstanding views over the Roosevelt Bridge. This stretch is particularly magical at night when the area is illuminated. Other attractions to this promenade include a few parks and the Riverside Restaurant. There is also a popular docking area at Riverwalk head, which is home to many boats.

Visitors are able to enjoy live music performances at the waterfront stage. From February through to November there are free concerts on Sundays. The music covers various genres, from blues, jazz, reggae, to rock. You can view the schedules here. We recommend attending one of these concerts along with visiting the Sunday Green Market, close to City Hall.

Heritage Museum Stuart

This museum will take you on a trip to time back to 1901. Inside this veteran building, the early life of Stuart has been preserved. You will get to learn more about pioneers who survived on harvesting fish and pineapples. From here you will discover how this town evolved over the “boom era”, and the Depression. Artifacts offer a window into the 108 years of growth which includes writings, maps, newspapers, journals, and photos. All the exhibits have been arranged in chronological order. The antique telephones, sewing machines, and refrigerators, and gas stoves are truly fascinating.

Town of Stuart

This building was once the general store of this town, and then later grew to accommodate a gas station and refinery. After a fire, the building was sold and later turned into a “feed supplier”. It is now a museum that houses the historic treasures of this town.

Elliott Museum Stuart Florida

From downtown Stuart, the Elliot Museum Stuart is a 12-minute drive by car and offers an intriguing and interesting history about Treasure Coast. The rotating exhibits offer a new discovery with each visit. There are also permanent displays that include sports galleries, the art studio, and an assortment of trucks, cars, boats, and bikes. There is an electronic-turntable that showcases these vehicles on-demand. This museum is also the home to the largest collection of the earliest models of Fords.

Lyric Theater

If you enjoy live performances, movies, and classic plays, you should visit the Lyric Theater. The Art Cinema shows are inclusive of international films, rare footage, indies, and documentaries. Opened in the year 1926, the architecture in itself is truly enthralling which includes a combination of classic French styles and mission revival.

This theater was initially a “silent” movie house. In the year 1987, residents in the area joined together to save the structure that was rapidly deteriorating. Later in 2014, this building underwent a makeover, which included new orchestra seating, a lobby, and an impressive sound system. In addition, a Steinway 9-foot piano is now included on the stage. This venue is highly elegant, and the splendor of this theater is now a rival to Carnegie Hall. Take a look interior of this venue here. For all the latest event schedules, click here.

Memorial Park Stuart Florida

Situated opposite the downtown courthouse in Stuart, this is a pet-friendly park. This venue is the home to year-round exciting events, that include a Bike Fest, an Artsfest, the Stuart Seafood Festival, the Nautical Flea Market, and the Weekend Green Market. Every Monday night from 5 pm to 9 pm come and enjoy the Food Truck Invasion. At these events, vendors come from across Florida where you can choose from a variety of cooked-to-order cuisines. These trucks are mainly operated by well-known chefs. You are encouraged to bring along your own blankets and folding chairs.

When you enter this park, there is a magnificent Banyan Tree. The pathways are paved, broad, and inviting. The fountain features a centerpiece fountain, where the water dances in a V-shaped spray. Plaques and memorials honor various military members from the Navy, Army, Coast Guard, and the Marines. The gazebo and picnic shelter offer areas where visitors can escape the heat of the day. There are also outdoor concerts on display on a colorful band shell. This park is also home to courts for shuffleboard and tennis, a playground, and a well-maintained sports ball field.

whether you are walking along the beautifully landscaped streets or taking a stroll along the boardwalk. America in Bloom praises Stuart as the most stunning small city in the nation. The residents are easy-going and friendly. 

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The first available record of a settlement on Singer Island dates back to 1906 with Inlet City. Inlet City was a spontaneous community of fishermen and squatters, most of whom came from Riviera Beach and the Bahamas. The settlement developed on both sides of the inlet, in use at the turn of the century. This inlet was located approximately opposite the filled area of land in Riviera Beach now known as Yacht Harbor Manor. As it was, married families settled on the north side of the inlet and single men settled on the south side. Fishermen were attracted to it as a place to dry the cotton nets that they used in those days, and for its proximity to the Gulf Stream. Because of the lack of government and local ordinances, squatters were content to build wherever and whatever they liked. Inlet City’s three main streets were named Fiddler’s Green, Goose Hollow, and Broadway. The community boasted of a store and a church which also served as a school. The school teacher was picked up at Currie Park, in West Palm Beach, on Monday morning and returned Friday afternoon burdened with all the fish that she could carry.

Until 1925 Singer Island was isolated from the mainland. In that year the county built the wooden “Sherman Point” bridge from Riviera Beach to Singer Island to accommodate Paris Singer’s proposed Blue Heron Hotel. This bridge from Sherman Point was destroyed in the hurricane of 1928 and was not rebuilt until 1935. Singer Island remained desolate after the 1928 hurricane and the following years of depression. Fishermen continued to take advantage of the abundance of crabs, clams, and many varieties of fish about the island’s shores. High school students were attracted to the island’s beaches on their days off; but further attempts at development would have to wait until World War II had ended. When the second wooden bridge burned, the concrete and steel Blue Heron lift span was constructed in 1949. The eastern half of this bridge remains as a fishing pier today. Finally, because of the problems created by ever increasing automobile and boat traffic, the lift span was replaced by the present high-rise bridge in 1976.

Paris Singer
Singer Island owes its name to Paris Singer, heir to the sewing machine fortune. In 1920, he visited Palm Beach and met Addison Mizner. He  agreed to pay the architect a $6,000 a year retainer for life if his work was confined exclusively to the Palm Beach area.r-Deputy Town Clerk Singer took his friends for picnics to a beautiful island north of Palm Beach which they called “Singer’s Island”. Singer’s dream was to build two enormous hotels there. On the south end would be the Paris Singer Hotel, and on the north end, the Blue Heron Hotel with a 36 hole golf course.

The estimated price was four million dollars – a fantastic amount in those years. Mizner was to design the hotels, but it is said Singer was so eager to start, construction of the Blue Heron was begun before the drawings were started. The opening date was set for 1926. The hotel’s service wing was the first and the last to be completed. Singer’s original plan was to finance the building from the sale of lots throughout the island. The Florida land boom was already slowing down in 1925, and hurricanes and the stock market crash dealt a mortal blow to Singer’s finances. The shell of the Blue Heron remained for 14 years, until it was demolished for scrap steel in the 1940’s. Singer reportedly left Florida a poor man and spent his years in Egypt on a houseboat on the Nile River.

Palm Beach Shores is located on the southern tip of Singer Island in Palm Beach County, Florida. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the east, Lake Worth on the west and Lake Worth Inlet on the south. When the first permanent settlers to the Lake Worth area began to settle around its shores, what is known as Singer Island today, was then an extension of Palm Beach. A series of inlets to Lake Worth were hand dug and maintained by these pioneer families. In 1915 the task of maintaining an inlet to Lake Worth was assumed by the United States Government and the present inlet was dredged in 1918. Lake Worth Inlet permanently separated what later became known as Singer Island from Palm Beach.

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The first available record of a settlement on Singer Island dates back to 1906 with Inlet City. Inlet City was a spontaneous community of fishermen and squatters, most of whom came from Riviera Beach and the Bahamas. The settlement developed on both sides of the inlet, in use at the turn of the century. This inlet was located approximately opposite the filled area of land in Riviera Beach now known as Yacht Harbor Manor. As it was, married families settled on the north side of the inlet and single men settled on the south side. Fishermen were attracted to it as a place to dry the cotton nets that they used in those days, and for its proximity to the Gulf Stream. Because of the lack of government and local ordinances, squatters were content to build wherever and whatever they liked. Inlet City’s three main streets were named Fiddler’s Green, Goose Hollow, and Broadway. The community boasted of a store and a church which also served as a school. The school teacher was picked up at Currie Park, in West Palm Beach, on Monday morning and returned Friday afternoon burdened with all the fish that she could carry.

Until 1925 Singer Island was isolated from the mainland. In that year the county built the wooden “Sherman Point” bridge from Riviera Beach to Singer Island to accommodate Paris Singer’s proposed Blue Heron Hotel. This bridge from Sherman Point was destroyed in the hurricane of 1928 and was not rebuilt until 1935. Singer Island remained desolate after the 1928 hurricane and the following years of depression. Fishermen continued to take advantage of the abundance of crabs, clams, and many varieties of fish about the island’s shores. High school students were attracted to the island’s beaches on their days off; but further attempts at development would have to wait until World War II had ended. When the second wooden bridge burned, the concrete and steel Blue Heron lift span was constructed in 1949. The eastern half of this bridge remains as a fishing pier today. Finally, because of the problems created by ever increasing automobile and boat traffic, the lift span was replaced by the present high-rise bridge in 1976.

Paris Singer
Singer Island owes its name to Paris Singer, heir to the sewing machine fortune. In 1920, he visited Palm Beach and met Addison Mizner. He  agreed to pay the architect a $6,000 a year retainer for life if his work was confined exclusively to the Palm Beach area.r-Deputy Town Clerk Singer took his friends for picnics to a beautiful island north of Palm Beach which they called “Singer’s Island”. Singer’s dream was to build two enormous hotels there. On the south end would be the Paris Singer Hotel, and on the north end, the Blue Heron Hotel with a 36 hole golf course.

The estimated price was four million dollars – a fantastic amount in those years. Mizner was to design the hotels, but it is said Singer was so eager to start, construction of the Blue Heron was begun before the drawings were started. The opening date was set for 1926. The hotel’s service wing was the first and the last to be completed. Singer’s original plan was to finance the building from the sale of lots throughout the island. The Florida land boom was already slowing down in 1925, and hurricanes and the stock market crash dealt a mortal blow to Singer’s finances. The shell of the Blue Heron remained for 14 years, until it was demolished for scrap steel in the 1940’s. Singer reportedly left Florida a poor man and spent his years in Egypt on a houseboat on the Nile River.
Early History Palm Beach Shores is located on the southern tip of Singer Island in Palm Beach County, Florida. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the east, Lake Worth on the west and Lake Worth Inlet on the south. When the first permanent settlers to the Lake Worth area began to settle around its shores, what is known as Singer Island today, was then an extension of Palm Beach. A series of inlets to Lake Worth were hand dug and maintained by these pioneer families. In 1915 the task of maintaining an inlet to Lake Worth was assumed by the United States Government and the present inlet was dredged in 1918. Lake Worth Inlet permanently separated what later became known as Singer Island from Palm Beach.
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The role in history that this geographical area played was and still is a subject for interesting discussions on countless evenings. Jupiter is very rich in Florida lore and history with the earliest records associated with the Jupiter Inlet that dates back to 1565.

How Did Jupiter Get Its Name?

When the Spanish first arrived in the area, they discovered the Jega Indians who lived on the river banks and the Inlet. The Tie Indians at this time named themselves the Jobe. The Spanish explorers then gave the river that ran into the Inlet the name “the Jobe River” after this native tribe. In 1763, when the English settlers discovered the area, Jobe sounded like the mythological god known as Jupiter or Jove to them, so the name Jupiter remained from then on.

The Dickinson Founders

The Jupiter region became an area of public attention at the time when Jonathan Dickinson, the person the Jonathan Dickinson State Park was named after, found himself shipwrecked along the shores in the Jupiter region. He narrowly escaped his death, when he came face to face with extremely hostile native Indians. In a journal that he kept, he writes about the ordeal that he went through with his family and the Jega Indians, along with his 230-mile trek to find safety in St. Augustine. Today, the Dubois Museum, located in Dubois Park stands on top of the Indian mound that was described by Dickinson as the location where the Indians held his family captive.

The Jupiter Lighthouse

In the 1800s the most identifiable landmark for the area of Jupiter is when the Jupiter Lighthouse was erected. This Lighthouse stands 105 feet in height on the top of a 46 ft, hill to the north of the Jupiter Inlet. This land which now goes by the name of Lighthouse Park, also once formed a portion of Fort Jupiter, which was one of the military installations created during the Seminole Indian Wars.

Life On The Jupiter Inlet And Loxahatchee River

Until 1929, before the Intracoastal was deepened, the Jupiter Inlet experienced a number of natural closing and opening cycles. When the Inlet became blocked on many occasions, the residents in this area would dig small channels with their shovels to help the water to start flowing again. In 1844, on one of these occasions, a 4-inch deep channel was dug into the Inlet by Captain Davis the mail carrier, along with several men before they set up camp for the night. Over the course of the night, the Captain along with his men was awakened by flowing water into the camp. By the following morning, the Inlet was close to a quarter-mile in width.

Jupiter Inlet and Loxahatchee

Earlier pioneer life around the Jupiter Inlet and Loxahatchee River played out in an entirely different way in comparison to today. The earlier settlers were very reliant on the accessibility to the Atlantic and the bounty that the Loxahatchee River had to offer to provide a living. Today it is sports fishing, boating, and tourism that attracts visitors and residents to these waters. In the early part of the 20th-century cypress and pine logging, citrus, flower, and pineapple farming, along with fishing were the main staples for the economy in the local area.

Old Jupiter

The river offered access to rail cars and steamboats, which were used for shipping goods all over the country. Until around the early 1900s, it was common to see a vessel known as the Jupiter School boat, collecting the earlier of the settler’s children. They were then taken to the dock in the town before walking to the School House. After school hours it was common to see the children collecting oysters in the oyster beds or playing in or around the river.

The Town of Jupiter

Today, Jupiter is still well-known for the Loxahatchee River, the Intracoastal Waterway, and the stunning beaches. This town is known for its cultural and vibrant life and is the home to the Florida History Center and Museum, along with numerous annual entertainment and arts festivals. Town and County parks also offer a host of recreational facilities dedicated to team sports such as soccer, basketball, and baseball, along with tennis courts, and the aquatic center. There are also access ramps directly into the Intracoastal Waterway.

A Popular Destination

Jupiter has a population of both part-time and full-time residents and is also a popular destination for vacations. This town features a combination of condominium communities, family-residential neighborhoods, along with upscale and luxurious waterfront communities. The area attracts professionals, young families, seasonal residents, and retirees.

The History Of Tequesta
In the year 1955, Charles Martyn asked a Bridge Tender to give a description of the area, which is now called the Village of Tequesta. His response was ” it is just a jungle”. Inspired by the description that the bridge tender gave, Martyn requested to tour this area. As these 2 men traveled the Intracoastal and Inlet by boat, Martyn was intrigued instantly by the potential and beauty of this area. He purchased 86 acres on Jupiter Island and went onto develop the Jupiter Inlet Colony.

Tequesta Indians

When excavating this site, the crew came across an Indian mound that was full of artifacts. Martyn’s intrigue and interest in Indian history gave him the inspiration to conduct research on the contents in the mound. From later speculation, it was believed that the Tequesta Indians owned the mound who was at the time encroaching on native Jega Indians. Martyn believed this to be a fact and decided to name the area that he was currently developing after the Tequesta tribe. This development which now goes by the name of the Tequesta Country Club was incorporated later as the Village of Tequesta.

Village of Tequesta

equesta began as the vision of one man and is now a Village that thrives along with many miles of beautiful waterfront properties. From the stunning ocean-front homes to the serene and tranquil Loxahatchee River, residents are attracted to the area for its natural beauty. A combination of condominium complexes, and single-family neighborhoods, attract retirees, working professionals, and families to this Village. Tequesta is also well-known for its recreational and cultural activities for all ages. The Village is also home to many service businesses, stores, and shops, along with the Lighthouse Gallery and School of Art. Visitors and new residents are welcomed by a hometown friendliness and sense-of-community.

There is probably no other area on the East Coast of the United States that enjoys such an international reputation when it comes to guiding ships over the centuries quite like the area that is now called Jupiter. This region projects further out towards the Atlantic Ocean than any of the other points that span the Florida coast.

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The original US 1 (now A1A) was built along the ocean in 1927. Five years later, the first residents of present Juno Beach, Oscar and Hulda Erikson, built the Juno Beach Cottages along A1A for rental to tourists. After World War II, James Watson started a rental trailer park nearby, which later became the Ocean Terrace Motel.

Seminole Golf Club

Investment banker Edward Francis “E. F.” Hutton (1875-1962) began development of the private, 140-acre Seminole Golf Club in 1929 on land previously owned by Harry Kelsey. Donald J. Ross designed the golf course, which was unusual for its combination of high elevation, mangrove swamp, and oceanfront location. (Nearby Donald Ross Road, however, was named for a local resident who was killed in World War II).

The annual Latham Reed Invitational

The Seminole Club was frequented by celebrities that included President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Duke of Windsor, John F. Kennedy, the Rev. Billy Graham, and Bing Crosby. The annual Latham Reed Invitational Pro-Am attracted legendary professionals, such as Sam Snead, Arnold Palmer, and Ben Hogan, until 1961. The club has remained closed to non-member tournaments for most of the years since then.

Juno Beach

The road that would become Ellison Wilson Road was built in 1928 and later named for a local resident who died in World War II. Walter Travers’ Rolling Green Corporation owned 80 acres on the Intracoastal Waterway, where houses were added slowly; John D. MacArthur’s Belvedere Development bought out Travers in the late 1960s.

Bessemer Properties, Inc.

In 1946 Bessemer Properties, Inc. bought most of the land east of A1A from Seminole Golf Club north to New Palm Beach Heights, platted by C. H. Nelson, Jr. in 1916 but undeveloped until the 1950s. Parts of New Palm Beach Heights would become Donald Ross Road, A1A, and Surfside Park. Bessemer Properties filed the Plat of Juno Beach, with large lots, in 1948, and improved the town by dredging a marsh to create Pelican Lake and building the original 500-foot Juno Pier. Residents formed the Juno Beach Association and incorporated the Town of Juno Beach in 1953, when the population was about 130 year-round residents, which swelled to 1,500 during winter.

The Juno Beach Garden Club

Residential development in Juno Beach during the 1950s can be seen south of Donald Ross Road between US 1 and A1A, where the Juno Beach Garden Club named the streets in 1958 for planets and Roman gods and goddesses. Also in the ‘50s, present-day US Highway 1 and Donald Ross Road were built, and Ellison Wilson Road was extended northward.

The Town of Juno Beach is on a barrier island along the Atlantic coastal ridge, created when the Intracoastal Waterway was dredged in the late 1800s; the property within today’s town boundaries was acquired in sections over many years.

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Before it was developed, the area that is referred to as Palm Beach Gardens today mainly consisted of pine forests and cattle ranches. When you looked to the west, you could also find swampland. This changed in 1959 when John D. MacArthur, a rich landowner that worked in insurance, announced that he intended to develop approximately 4,000 acres of land in this area. This allowed him to construct homes for over 55,000 people. Originally, he wanted to name the development “Palm Beach City.” However, the Florida Legislature turned this down because they believed the name was too similar to Palm Beach. He opted for Palm Beach Gardens instead since it was his intention to build a proper city. When it was first incorporated in 1959, it was a paper town. According to the 1960 census, the town originally had a population of just one person. This was a squatter that was living on the property with permission from MacArthur.

Palm Beach Gardens in the 60s

Throughout the 1960s, Palm Beach Gardens so rapid development. There were nearly 7,000 residents by 1970. MacArthur bought a banyan tree that was around 80 years old as a showcase for the community. The tree, which was located in Lake Park, was originally scheduled to be cut down. Moving the tree took $30,000 and over 1,000 hours of manpower. The next year, another banyan tree was moved. When the first tree was being moved via the Florida East Coast Railway, the tree shifted, which caused Western Union telephone and telegraph lines to be damage. Because of this, communications between Miami and the rest of the world were cut off until after repairs could be completed. Today, the trees can still be seen in MacArthur Boulevard Center. The trees are also a part of the city shield. Alexandre Renoir, who is the great-grandson of famed artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, presented the city with a painting that featured these trees in January 2007. The painting is now on display in the city hall, which is located on North Military Trail.

Palm Beach Gardens in the 70s

Throughout the 70s and 80s, Palm Beach Gardens grew more slowly, but growth still remained steady. However, MacArthur’s goal of 55,000 residents had yet to be reached. When the Gardens Mall, which was 1,300,000-square-feet in size, was opened in 1988, the area saw a surge of development. There was also a boom when the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation sold off around 5,000 acres of city property in 1999. The property was able to be developed quickly, and because of this, Palm Beach Gardens saw even more growth. In 1989, the city adopted an ordinance regarding Art in Public Places. Since then, Palm Beach Gardens has built a large collection of artwork.

Palm Beach Gardens & PGA

The headquarters of The Professional Golfers’ Association of America is headquartered here. Within city limits, you can find 12 separate golf courses. One of these courses is under the ownership of the municipality. Two different Palm Beach Gardens locations have hosted The Honda Classic. The Country Club at Mirasol hosted it between 2003 and 2006. Since the year 2007, it’s been hosted at The PGA National Resort and Spa. Other events were also hosted at this facility, including the 1983 Ryder Cup and the 1987 PGA Championship. The Senior PGA Championship was hosted here from 1982 to 2000.

Local Weather

Because of the hard freezes that took place in 1985 and 1989, some tropical landscaping in the Palm Beach Gardens area has been damaged. Thankfully, temperatures haven’t dropped below freezing since that time. In 2004 and 2005, three hurricanes hit the city: Hurricane Frances, Hurricane Jeanne, and Hurricane Wilma. Each storm caused the city to lose power for several days. The hurricanes also destroyed traffic signals and directional signs. Home and businesses sustained damage during this time as well, particularly during the first two storms. Because of this, the cost of construction materials and work was very expensive during a period of time. By the time Hurricane Wilma struck, many properties were just finishing up repairs. This caused additional damage and even caused some of these properties to be destroyed.

 

On the main stretch of PGA Boulevard, you can find many shopping facilities, like The Gardens Mall, Legacy Place, PGA Commons, Midtown, and of course, Downtown at the Gardens The area has a thriving retail market.

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He bought an additional 200 acres. The piece of land began from Lake Worth to the Florida East Coast Railway tracks. Then from 14th Street to 10th Street. In 1913 Newcomb came up with a plat that envisioned Riviera as a resort community. That year, he managed to sell about 30 lots by auction. Next, came Widow Dorothy who purchased a home and opened the Riviera Cash Grocery. She added the only gas pump in the town while serving as postmistress into the ’20s. In the mid-1920s Newcomb sold lots. On the other hand, other men developed sections of Riviera. G. W. Bingman took on the east of Broadway from 20th to 23rd Street, whereas the Perry family developed Inlet Grove and Inlet City.

Riviera Cash Grocery

William Taylor and George Currie developed plats on the west of Riviera where black families settled. In 1906, a squatter’s community of fishermen together with their families had occupied the south end of Singer Island. That’s in a small community locally known as Inlet City. A majority of these residents originated from the Bahamas and had the nickname “conchs”. The Moree’s, Pinder’s, and Griffin’s were some of the families that occupied the place. The Island is one of the reasons that drove the fishermen to the place, as they would dry their cotton nets there. Better still, the island was close to the Gulf Stream that boasted much fertility. From Eleuthera in the Bahamas, Annie and Joseph Griffin together with their 7 children joined the fishing colony at the inlet at around 1912.

Riviera Beach in 1919

Their youngest kid, Olive Rowena, was the mother to former state attorney Zell Davis Jr, whose growing up is traced back to Riviera Beach. In 1919, the fishing colony transferred to the mainland. A few years later in the ’20s, Riviera Beach produced the largest amount of fish consumed on Florida’s east coast. Most of it was taken to a fish market by the name Fulton, located in New York. By 1922, 75 families depending on fishing for a living had their homes in Riviera. It’s at this time, some qualified voters reached a decision to incorporate and the town acquired its new name – Riviera Beach. That’s in 1942. All these happened despite news that the West Palm Beach planned a takeover.

Mangonia & Mangonia Park Between 1894 and 1906, Mangonia had its own post office located south of Judge Heyser’s Riviera. Nowadays, Mangonia belongs to West Palm Beach, as part of the Old Northwood District. Its name was coined by Rev. Elbridge Gale, a farmer in Kansas who grew mangoes.

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In 1901 Charles N. Newcomb acquired the Riviera hotel. His tremendous efforts in improving the hotel saw it receive a couple of A-class visitors. Andrew Carnegie, Henry Flagler, the Astors, and various Vanderbilts are just but a few of those who set foot in the hotel. Newcomb’s pursuit was not over yet. He bought an additional 200 acres. The piece of land began from Lake Worth to the Florida East Coast Railway tracks. Then from 14th Street to 10th Street. In 1913 Newcomb came up with a plat that envisioned Riviera as a resort community. That year, he managed to sell about 30 lots by auction.

Inlet Grove and Inlet City

Next, came Widow Dorothy who purchased a home and opened the Riviera Cash Grocery. She added the only gas pump in the town while serving as postmistress into the ’20s. In the mid-1920s Newcomb sold lots. On the other hand, other men developed sections of Riviera. G. W. Bingman took on the east of Broadway from 20th to 23rd Street, whereas the Perry family developed Inlet Grove and Inlet City. William Taylor and George Currie developed plats on the west of Riviera where black families settled. In 1906, a squatter’s community of fishermen together with their families had occupied the south end of Singer Island. That’s in a small community locally known as Inlet City. A majority of these residents originated from the Bahamas and had the nickname “conchs”. The Moree’s, Pinder’s, and Griffin’s were some of the families that occupied the place.

 The Gulf Stream that boasted much fertility

The Island is one of the reasons that drove the fishermen to the place, as they would dry their cotton nets there. Better still, the island was close to the Gulf Stream that boasted much fertility. From Eleuthera in the Bahamas, Annie and Joseph Griffin together with their 7 children joined the fishing colony at the inlet at around 1912. Their youngest kid, Olive Rowena, was the mother to former state attorney Zell Davis Jr, whose growing up is traced back to Riviera Beach. In 1919, the fishing colony transferred to the mainland. A few years later in the ’20s, Riviera Beach produced the largest amount of fish consumed on Florida’s east coast. Most of it was taken to a fish market by the name Fulton, located in New York. By 1922, 75 families depending on fishing for a living had their homes in Riviera. It’s at this time, some qualified voters reached a decision to incorporate and the town acquired its new name – Riviera Beach. That’s in 1942. All these happened despite news that the West Palm Beach planned a takeover.

From Riviera To Riviera Beach The Riviera came to be in the late ’80s. Mattie Spencer Heyser, the partner to Judge Allen Heyser changed the name of their Oak Lawn Post Office and Oak Lawn Hotel to Riviera. Precisely, this was in 1893. After a six-year stay, Heyser moved to Miami at a time when the Dade County seat returned. As time moved by, things took a turn. In 1901 Charles N. Newcomb acquired the Riviera hotel. His tremendous efforts in improving the hotel saw it receive a couple of A-class visitors. Andrew Carnegie, Henry Flagler, the Astors, and various Vanderbilts are just but a few of those who set foot in the hotel.

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